The Chinese-African Young Woman Came to Taiwan to Work, to Find Her Birth Mother

In search of one’s own roots here, translated…

“I really want to see my mother again”, the twenty-year-old African-Taiwanese woman, Annie Dai recently joined in the Outstanding Youth Short-Term Point activities, from the U.S., she’d come to Taiwan, and will soon be off to South African for an internship, other than hoping to gain some precious working experiences, she’d carried a secret with her, hoping, to find her mother, who’d given her up for adoption to the U.S. again.

A junior in the psych department of Florida State, Jasmine Banks went through the selection process, with her excellent scholastic performances, was sponsored by the scholarship committee of Taiwanese-American Foundation, for her seven weeks’ worth of internship to Taiwan.

From before, she’d received the scholarship from the foundation too, she’d arrived here on the 27th of last month, was ushered by the Chenggong University, and is now currently, interning in the Southern Scientific’s Department of Sciences.

Annie Dai said, that she’d gotten into this program, because she’d wanted to gain the experiences, she’d planned to go to grad school later, and because of where she came from, she’d wanted, to visit the place where she was, born.

台非混血的戴安妮利用暑假到台灣參與企業實習,希望能找到親生母親。 記者修瑞瑩/攝...here’s the bright young woman, photo from UDN.com…

Having outstanding grades, with plans for her own futures, she’d had a very trying past, her mother is Taiwanese, her father, African, she only recalled her life in the various foster homes growing up, it was at age nine, with her middle-school aged older sister, they were, both adopted by American parents.

Although she’d arrived in the U.S. at age nine, but she’d forgotten about Chinese, and can only writer her name in Chinese, couldn’t speak a word of it at all.

She said, that she’d felt confused, upset of where she came from, couldn’t understand why her family had, abandoned her, but now, she’d overcome that, her adoptive father is Caucasian, her adoptive mother, an African-American, and although her adoptive parents split up, and she’s now, living with her adoptive father, she has a good life.  But I’d still wanted to meet the woman who gave birth to me, “After all, she did, have me”.

Annie Dai, after arriving in Taiwan, told the person from Chenggong University who went to pick her up this, but because she’d left for the U.S. when she was quite young, she can only remember that she’d attended the Dzi-Chiang Elementary School in Hsinbei City, and the social worker who sent her to U.S. to be adopted.

After Chenggong University found this out, the school quickly found the Catholic organization that handled her adoption from before, and the social workers are already, working on helping to reunite her with her mother, but worried, if the mother would want to reunite with the child she’d, given up for adoption from back then.

As she’d arrived, Annie Dai’s impressions of Taiwan were, “Too hot”, “The foods are amazing here”, the Chinese that was, hidden in the depth of her memory, slowly came back too, she’d hoped, she could, come to the north, to where she was born, where she’d lived, for a couple of years during her childhood.

So, this, is a young woman’s brave journey, to find her own roots, and, nobody knows if she’ll be able to, reunite with her birth mother, or, what the circumstances were, when the mother decided, to give her up for adoption, but at least, this young woman took the very first steps to find out where she came from, so, the rest is still, up to fate!

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About taurusingemini

All I have to say, I've already said it, and, let's just say, that I'm someone who's ENDURED through a TON of losses in my life, and I still made it to the very top of MY game here, TADA!!!
This entry was posted in Experiences of Life, Properties of Life, the Consequences of Life, The Passages in Life, the Process of Life, Values of Life and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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